Lamb Cawl – Happy St. David’s Day.

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Happy National Welsh Day.

My husband has some Welsh ancestory so we thought it would be nice to indulge ourselves in one of Wales’  favourite meals. Cawl.

Its a stew with lots of leek, root veggies and meat. In this instance lamb.

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So I got:-

2 Tbls oil

6 lamb chump chops (or small shanks)

2 cups sliced leek

1 cup diced pumpkin

1 medium carrot – chopped into small chunks

1 cup sliced cabbage

some herbs  i.e.  thyme, rosemary, bay leaf

salt, pepper, cinnamon

water

Season lamb with salt, pepper and cinnamon.

Heat oil in a large saucepan, add the lamb and brown on all sides. Take the lamb out of the saucepan and throw in the leeks, carrot, pumpkin and herbs. Fry for a minute or two stirring. If it gets too dry add a little water.

Return the meat to the saucepan and stir in with the veggies. Add about a litre of water, stir well, bring to the boil, then turn the heat down to low, cover and leave it to simmer for about an hour, stirring occasionally.

Take the lid off and continue to simmer for another 30-40 minutes or until the meat is very tender and the sauce has thickened up a little.

Add the cabbage for the last 10 minutes of cooking.

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I served it with some mashed potato and toasted sourdough bread (and a glass of Shiraz)

It went down really well.

Enjoy…

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Lamb with Onion, Ginger and Coriander Relish

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I’ve had to renew Tessa Kiros’ ‘Falling Cloudberries’ from the library because there are still a few recipes I want to try.

January’s The Cookbook Guru book is one I’ll have to buy I think. Problem is I have no more room left for any more books. Well, that’s something I’m going to have to deal with…

This particular dish looked too good to pass up.

It calls for a 1.3kg leg of lamb but with only my husband and myself to cook for, it was way too much so I de-boned a leg of lamb and cut off a 700g piece (the rest got cut up and put in the freezer for next time). This was enough for dinner and sandwiches the next day.

My sister is actually waiting for this post so she can make it. Better get on with it then.

To a bowl add 250g plain yoghurt, 4 cloves grated or crushed garlic, 1 tsp each allspice, sweet paprika, ground cumin and ground coriander, 1/2 tsp each ground cardamom, salt and ground black pepper. Give this a really good mix.

Put your lamb in a container where it will fit compactly and smoother it all over with the yoghurt marinade.

This amount of marinade will probably be enough for a whole leg of lamb.

Cover and leave to marinade overnight, or as long as possible, in the fridge. (I managed to leave it for 4 hours)

Take the lamb our of the fridge about 30 minutes before cooking it it let it come to room temperature.

Lift the lamb from the marinade but don’t scrape any of the yoghurt off.

The recipe says to lay the lamb on a wire rack and bake for 1 hour at 200oc but I lay the lamb on some chunks of potato that I’d coated in garlic, oil, salt and lemon juice and baked at 160oc for nearly 2 hours, turning the meat over after 1 hour.

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While the meat was absolutely delicious, I really loved the relish that’s served with it. So fresh and tangy.

Finely dice 1/2 a brown onion and gently saute in 2 Tblsp olive oil until starting to go brown on the edges. Add 3 Tblsp of water and continue to cook for a few more minutes until the water has reduced and the onions are soft. Take off the heat and add 2-3 tsp finely grated ginger and leave this to cool. Transfer to a serving bowl and add the juice of 1 lime, a big handful of chopped fresh coriander leaves and a dash or two of some chilli oil or a bit of sambal oelek. Give it a really good stir.

Leave the lamb to stand for at least 10 minutes before slicing up and serving with a spoonfull of the relish.

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The meat came out so tender and juicy. I’ll be making this again and again and again….

Enjoy…

Moroccan-Spiced Lamb with Prunes and Saffron

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Brian (the Husband) had the day off yesterday.  He decided it was about time he got in the kitchen and did some cooking.

Now, Brian is the chief cheesecake  and Anzac biscuit maker in this household, but he also makes a mean Lamb and Prune curry.

This recipe is adapted from  ABC Delicious Magazine  from a few years back, but its one he keeps going back to because … well… it’s wonderful…

The original recipe calls for lamb shanks, but he used diced lamb instead. 500g of it in  fact, which he tossed in 1-2 tablespoons of plain flour, salt, pepper and 1 tsp ground cinnamon.

Then heat 3 tablespoons olive oil in a heavy based saucepan and brown the meat all over. Take meat out, add a little more oil if pan is dry,  throw in 1 large diced onion and cook for a few minutes until brown. Add 4-5 cloves finely chopped garlic, 2 tsp ground cumin, 2 tsp ground coriander,  1 tsp freshly grated ginger, 1 1/2 tsp smoked paprika, (Brian used a sprinkle of  hot paprika as well), 2 tsp Harissa paste ( or minced red chilli) and 1 small dried red  chilli. Cook for about 2 minutes. Add  1 piece preserved lemon rind – diced (don’t use the pith and flesh. You can also use 1 tsp lemon zest if preserved lemon is handy), 500ml beef stock,1 tbs raw sugar and 400g canned chopped tomatoes. Return the lamb to the pan, bring it all to the boil, reduce the heat to low and simmer, covered for 1 hour, stirring often, scrapping the bottom of the pan to make sure all the sticky bits make their way back into the sauce.

In the meantime, soak a generous pinch of saffron threads  in 2 tbs warm water and set aside to infuse.

After one hour, add the saffron and its soaking water and continue simmering for another hour, with pan partially covered, adding 200g pitted prunes for the last 10 minutes.

Brian serves this amazing dish with steamed rice and lots of fresh coriander.

Sooo Yum.

Enjoy… brians curry 2